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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of electrical aspects of the pasteurization of wine by dielectric heating found in the catalog.

electrical aspects of the pasteurization of wine by dielectric heating

Jerome Hugo Johnson

electrical aspects of the pasteurization of wine by dielectric heating

by Jerome Hugo Johnson

  • 157 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wine and wine making.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Jerome Hugo Johnson.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination74 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages74
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14301769M

      Since food is generally of low thermal conductivity, heating by conventional methods remains relatively slow. Thanks to its volumetric and rapid heating, microwave (MW) technology is successfully used in many applications of food processing. In this chapter, fundamental principles of MW heating are briefly presented. MW drying and MW microbial . Microwave heating is attractive for heating of foods due to its origin within the material, fast temperature rise, controllable heat deposition, and easy clean-up. The very high frequencies used in microwave heating allow for rapid energy transfers and, thus, high rates of heating. These rates are a main advantage of this technique.

    Pasteurization is the process of heating a liquid to below the boiling point to destroy microorganisms. It was developed by Louis Pasteur in to improve the keeping qualities of wine. Commercial pasteurization of milk began in the late s in Europe and in the early s in the United States. Non-destructive systems are recent trends for quality evaluation of fruits and vegetables. Information on post-harvest variations in electrical properties is needed to develop new instruments for this purpose. Electrical properties are finding increasing application in agriculture and food processing industries. Knowledge of dielectric properties of foods as a function of .

    Pasteurization is a heat treatment or thermal process that kills part but not all of the vegetative microorganisms in the food and is consequently used for foods, which are further processed or stored under conditions, which minimize growth. In the case of milk, pasteurization is used to kill pathogenic microorganisms. USB1 US09/, USA USB1 US B1 US B1 US B1 US A US A US A US B1 US B1 US B1 Authority US United States Prior art keywords food product frequency resonance frequency method heating Prior art date Legal status (The legal status is an .


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Electrical aspects of the pasteurization of wine by dielectric heating by Jerome Hugo Johnson Download PDF EPUB FB2

The electrical aspects of the pasteurization of wine by dielectric heatingAuthor: Jerome Hugo Johnson. Tunnel Pasteurizers are massive units and have strict power, water, air, and heating requirements.

They utilize a conveyor belt. Cans and bottles are entered one one end and the conveyor belt runs very slowly. They use steam and water in different zones to heat and cool the packaged wine. They are also costly to run and take up a lot of space.

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link). Attaining biological stability in wine has been a problem for winemakers for centuries.

The main methods for preventing microbes from destroying wine have been the addition of chemicals such as sulphur dioxide and potassium sorbate and ultra filtration. These methods are less than satisfactory. Chemicals can only be used to a certain level before they affect the taste of the wine Cited by: 2.

Microwave heating at MHz has great potential for raw cow’s milk pasteurization, while radio-frequency heating at and MHz and microwave heating at. Ohmic heating (joule heating, electrical resistance heating, direct electrical resistance heating, electro heating or electro conductive heating) is a process in which heat is generated in the.

Modelling ohmic pasteurization involved simultaneous solution of: 1) Laplace’s equation which describes the distribution of electrical potential within a food; 2) heat transfer equation using a source term involving the displacement of electrical potential; 3) kinetics of inactivation of microorganisms likely to be contaminating the product.

It is evident that frequency level, temperature and properties of food, such as viscosity, water content and chemical composition affect the dielectric properties and thus the RF heating. Ohmic heating technology is considered a major advance in the continuous processing of particulate food products.

This chapter describes the basic principles and physical modeling of ohmic devices designed to heat Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids and food mixtures. Technical aspects are discussed and various industrial applications are presented. From different available methods, dielectric heating was chosen as the most promising technique for a continuous and flexible pasteurization process of sausage emulsions.

The dielectric properties of cereals grain and oilseeds are essential for understanding their electrical behaviour, and the development of indirect non-destructive methods for determining their physical properties (Trabelsi and Nelson ) and are also important in the design of equipments for radiofrequency or microwave dielectric heating.

Heat the bottles. Heat the water until the temperature inside the bottle reaches °F (74 °C). This temperature kills the yeast; this temperature also kills harmful bacteria such as Salmonella, Listeria, and E.

coli. Once the temperature reaches °F (74 °C), hold it at this temperature for 15 seconds, then immediately remove the : 45K. Dear Colleagues, Advanced and novel thermal technologies, such as ohmic heating, dielectric heating (e.g., microwave heating and radio frequency heating), and inductive heating, have been developed to improve the effectiveness of heat processing whilst guaranteeing food safety and eliminating undesirable impacts on the organoleptic and nutritional properties of foods.

Fabrizio Parodi, in Comprehensive Polymer Science and Supplements, General Aspects Dielectric Heating of Materials. The dielectric heating technique dates back to the last 20 years of 19th century, when it was used in the therapeutic method of diathermy, 10, 11 consisting of the internal warming of the human body or its parts by exposure to.

Flash pasteurization is a process used by NON-KOSHER wines too, including Louis Latour (“The wine is passed through a heat exchanger that raises the temperature to 72°C for seconds”) & Beaucastel (“The skins of the grapes are heated briefly to 80 °C / °F and then cooled to 20 °C /6O °F”) to name two.

This pasteurization is. The dielectric loss factor is a measure of the dissipation of electric energy in the form of heat; namely, how the energy from an applied electrical field is converted to h The.

A food product is heated by maintaining the food product in an AC electrical field generated by an RF signal. As the heating takes place, maximum energy is delivered to the food product using automatic impedance matching to adjust the rate of the process.

The original method of pasteurization was vat pasteurization, which heat milk or other liquid ingredients in a large tank for a at least 30 minutes.

It is now used primarily in the dairy industry for preparing milk for making starter cultures in the processing of cheese, yogurt, buttermilk and for pasteurizing some ice cream mixes. A food product is heated by maintaining the food product in an AC electrical field provided by an RF signal at an RF frequency that matches a Debye resonance frequency or frequencies of one or more components of the food product.

As the food product warms, the frequency of the RF signal is automatically adjusted to track changes in the Debye resonance frequency, which.

This chapter aims at introducing basic features of dielectric heating and to present the applications in the food industry.

Based on a literature survey of recent works, many examples are given to highlight the main advantages of the microwave (MW) technology in food processing.

The case of most processes involving heating is addressed. Pasteurization is the process of heating a substance, usually a liquid, to a temperature high enough to kill any microscopic organisms contained in it. The process was developed by Louis Pasteur and was originally used for wine, although it is now more commonly used for dairy products.

Pasteurizing homemade wine stops the fermentation process. Pasteurization is seldom used in winemaking. Although it is interesting to note that when he developed the process that was named after him, Pasteur was originally working for a winery which wanted to prevent their wine from turning into vinegar.

The dielectric properties of foods are the principal parameters that determine the coupling and distribution of electromagnetic energy during dielectric heating (Mudgett,Chapter 7).

Dielectric properties are normally described in terms of the complex relative permittivity, ε r: (1) ε r =ε r ′ − j ε r ″ where j = −1.